Anime/Manga favorite characters (1/?)
➤ Dino Cavallone 【Katekyo Hitman Reborn!】

(via notturnos)

Tags: art style

 

it’s a three-patch problem

it’s a three-patch problem

(Source: bowties-and-cheekbones, via never-laugh-at-a-live-sherlock)

Tags: hands folded

xfreischutz:

I was going to review my french and linguistics but then this happened instead.
Except it’s 3.30am so it’s half-assed. //shotdead

But hopefully people will find this of use. \o/ Sorry this took so long, Anon, and I hope it answers your questions.

(via blpak)

Tags: ref

silentgiantla:

Animated artwork by Rebecca Mock

Fine, detailed and subtle animated artwork created by New York illustrator Rebecca Mock. Apparently the animated gif back to stay, gradually more and more people are exploring this old format and customers asking for shouting. Several of these illustrations were created for the New York Times or The Warlus magazine.

(via blpak)

Tags: idea

unwrapping:

Add a Read More Break to a Tumblr Photo Caption: While text posts have a handy icon to insert a read more break, other Tumblr post types do not. This example shows adding a read more break for a photo post. But this tip also works with the quote, link, audio and video posts on the desktop. Compose your text then follow these steps.
Click the <html> icon on the formatting bar. (If you use the plain text/HTML editor, skip to step 2.)
HTML is revealed. Place your cursor at the break point — where you want the read more break to appear.
Type in  <!-- more -->(The single spaces around “more” are key.)
Click Post to publish.
The read more break shows in your post.
See the illustrated blog post with a read more break.

unwrapping:

Add a Read More Break to a Tumblr Photo Caption: 
While text posts have a handy icon to insert a read more break, other Tumblr post types do not. This example shows adding a read more break for a photo post. But this tip also works with the quote, link, audio and video posts on the desktop. Compose your text then follow these steps.

  1. Click the <html> icon on the formatting bar. (If you use the plain text/HTML editor, skip to step 2.)
  2. HTML is revealed. Place your cursor at the break point — where you want the read more break to appear.
  3. Type in  <!-- more -->
    (The single spaces around “more” are key.)
  4. Click Post to publish.
  5. The read more break shows in your post.

See the illustrated blog post with a read more break.

(via mid0nz)

Tags: ref

mynameismad:

bktcm:

ucresearch:

The visual linguistics of a comic book page
Inside Science recently wrote about the study by UCSD’s Neil Cohn, Navigating Comics, which looks at the underlying structure of the comics language:

People who read the English written word scan text from left to right. Once our eyes hit the end of the page, we stop. Then ding!, like an old-time typewriter, our eyes shift downward and snap back to the left to start reading the next line. This is known as a “Z-path,” as our eyes whip about like the end of Zorro’s sword.
But that linear track gets derailed in comics with complex layouts and Cohn wanted to know if experienced readers had strategies to follow along.
Cohn rustled up 145 participants at the 2004 Comic-Con International, a comic book convention held in San Diego. Participants had varying experience with reading comics, ranging from “never” to “often.”
Each participant was given a booklet containing 12 pages of blank panels. Each page was independent of the rest and used different design techniques.

Read More →

O-OH. OH IM LIKE ACTUALLY IN PAIN LOOKING AT THOSE LAYOUTS.

All of these layouts cause me physical pain, except for the grid one, which just bores me to death

mynameismad:

bktcm:

ucresearch:

The visual linguistics of a comic book page


Inside Science recently wrote about the study by UCSD’s Neil Cohn, Navigating Comics, which looks at the underlying structure of the comics language:

People who read the English written word scan text from left to right. Once our eyes hit the end of the page, we stop. Then ding!, like an old-time typewriter, our eyes shift downward and snap back to the left to start reading the next line. This is known as a “Z-path,” as our eyes whip about like the end of Zorro’s sword.

But that linear track gets derailed in comics with complex layouts and Cohn wanted to know if experienced readers had strategies to follow along.

Cohn rustled up 145 participants at the 2004 Comic-Con International, a comic book convention held in San Diego. Participants had varying experience with reading comics, ranging from “never” to “often.”

Each participant was given a booklet containing 12 pages of blank panels. Each page was independent of the rest and used different design techniques.

Read More →

O-OH. OH IM LIKE ACTUALLY IN PAIN LOOKING AT THOSE LAYOUTS.

All of these layouts cause me physical pain, except for the grid one, which just bores me to death

(via blpak)

Tags: ref